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It is no secret that Google uses a team of search quality raters to evaluate how good of a job the algorithm is doing ranking web pages.

Google publishes their official Search Result Quality Rating Guidelines on a regular basis shredding some light on what kind of instructions their human raters receive on how to evaluate Google SERPs.

The guidelines provide lots of insight into how Google defines quality and what they mean their algorithm to understand.

Let’s look at the search quality evaluation guidelines and what SEO content publishers need to know about what is quality and how to adapt their strategy accordingly:

Quality is Equivalent to the Average User’s Judgment of Quality

One of the main takeaways is that Google is looking for pages that help searchers, exactly as it has always said. Quality is basically equivalent to the average user’s judgment of quality.

Yes, that is still vague, but we all know a low-quality site when we see one. Similarly, we all know a high-quality one. We might differ in the details, but if we are talking about general perception I think most people will agree.

Keep Your Content Fresh

Google’s Quality Rating Guidelines are a reminder for small business, especially e-commerce, to keep their content fresh. The Guidelines give special attention to freshness as a measure of its “High Needs Met” (HNM) ratings.

The report tells us,

For these queries, pages about past events, old product models and prices, outdated information, etc. are not helpful. They should be considered “stale” and given low Needs Met ratings. In some cases, stale results are useless and should be rated FailsM.

If you are providing product information, make sure it is well maintained with current data. This should include a review of the on-page SEO factors such as buzz keywords and relevant trends. You can also add value and improve your score in this area by adding fresh content surrounding product updates and new releases by a well-maintained blog on your site.

For E-A-T (Expertise, Authority, Trustworthiness) websites, (which might include technology blogs or tutorial sites, for example), the freshness scale is less important since a fair amount of content in this field does not change (Think software tutorials or a first-aid procedure).

However, a business should still take advantage of the freshness factor and aim for a High Needs Met Rating by updating, improving and adding value to existing, static content from time to time.

YMYL (Your Money or Your Life) Sites Are Held to Higher Standards

According to the guidelines, Evaluators hold YMYL sites to higher standards.

YMYL (i.e. Your Money or Your Life) sites and include financial, medical, healthcare, security sites

  • Pages providing information on taxes, financial planning, insurance, etc.
  • Pages providing advice or information on drugs, diseases, (mental) health, nutrition, etc.
  • Online banking sites
  • Pages that provide legal advice on child custody, divorce, citizenship, etc.

For every YMYL site, search quality raters are required to research their reputation.

 

YMYL sites must convince search quality raters that they have a healthy level of online reputation and credibility.

Google Strives to Identify “Main Content” on a Web Page

Another big takeaway is Google’s emphasis on “main content.” Google was clear in instructing raters that they should be on the lookout for, and actively encouraged to, downgrade pages that have a hard time distinguishing main content from ads or other distractions on the page.

In summary, this is all about user experience and Google’s continual desire to make sure their index provides preference to site pages that have a clear separation between advertising and content.

Quality raters are encouraged to provide a less than helpful rating on pages where the lines between this separation is blurred. And that provides a great benefit to users.

Make Your Site Mobile-Friendly

A large proportion of the guidelines was focused around mobile and it is clear Google now views this as a sign of a quality website.

If this is the case, it means that anyone producing amazing content on a site which is not mobile friendly is going to be viewed as low quality. This should be avoided at all costs.

Google Wants to “Think” Like Human Beings Do

The release of the latest Google Quality Rating Guidelines is yet another reminder that Google does strive to build an algorithm that would be able to think as human beings do.

It layers on a human component to ensure the results Google provides are quality and match the true intent of the search query.

“Quality” and “relevancy”.

It just couldn’t be simpler than that.

That’s what users are searching for when they use a search engine like Google. That’s what Google wants to offer its users.

Google aims at thinking more and more like a human being so that it may “understand”, “feel” and “see” what a user understands, feels and sees when he / she visits a website suggested by a Google search.

And what are people looking for? Quality relevant sites or web pages.

Put Your Users First

Put your users first and foremost:

  1. Write high-quality, in-depth, well-researched articles.
  2. Write for users. Optimize for search engines.
  3. Provide helpful navigation-think breadcrumbs.
  4. Invest in clutter-free, User-friendly, mobile-friendly design.
  5. Display your address and contact information clearly.
  6. Create and maintain a positive reputation. Content won’t save you if you send hitmen after your customers (true story!).

Expert Content Is Rewarded Irrelevant of the Domain Authority

We’re coming increasingly closer to a point where quality, expert content will be rewarded irrelevant of the domain authority of a website.

It seems the algorithm is coming increasingly intelligent and capable of determining the best content, so those that put the effort in sharing details and info will be rewarded. Personally, we’re probably still a while away from this as an absolute, but from the look of the guidelines things are going that way.

The Fundamental Principles Are The Same: Provide Quality, Put the User First…

There’s really nothing new in the guidelines, it’s very similar to the guidelines leaked (supposedly unofficially!) in 2008, and a few times since. The overall message is the same as it always was: you need to build sites with original, quality content that provides real value to the searcher.

They have defined a quantitative process for assessing this, including Expertise, Authority, and Trustworthiness, and how well it meets the searcher’s needs. The process is interesting, but not revolutionary, it’s simply a formal definition of what we all understood anyway.

Many people will flock to this document, in the hope it will give some insights into how to ‘game’ the system, which of course it won’t!

Although the general principles of the guidelines will be familiar to anybody involved in SEO, it’s still well worth a read, just to make sure there aren’t any key areas you have missed in your own site. It will show you how to view your site through the eyes of a Google rater, and more importantly, through the eyes of a user.

Quality raters

The Emphasis is on the Quality

It’s clear that Google prefers information posted by a human rather than machine-generated information to evaluate quality. They also place more emphasis on relevant indicators such as time spent on the website etc. and customer reviews.

Again, the emphasis here is on the content of the reviews and not the number of reviews.

Got any questions? Let us know in the comments below!